A Step-by-step Guide to IELTS Writing Task 2 (Argument)

This post first appeared on my website http://ift.tt/2da1SCy and has also been replicated on my YES! IELTS blog

It describes a step-by-step approach to writing an essay for IELTS Writing Task 2. The topic is from Official IELTS Practice Materials.

Many old buildings are protected by law because they are part of a nation’s history. However, some people think old buildings should be knocked down to make way for new ones because people need houses and offices.


How important is it to maintain old buildings? Should history stand in the way of progress?

Step 1

First, I carefully read the question and highlight / underline the key words.

Many old buildings are protected by law because they are part of a nation’s history. However, some people think old buildings should be knocked down to make way for new ones because people need houses and offices.


How important is it to maintain old buildings? Should history stand in the way of progress?

Then I think about what the question is actually asking. I create a yes-no question so that I can answer it easily.

Should we knock down old buildings to make way for new ones?

I also look at other words in the question, ones that can give me ideas for my brainstorming. Not all questions will include helpful words, but many do. In this case I make a mental note of or lightly circle/underline the following words:

  • law
  • history
  • houses
  • offices
  • progress

 

Step 2

I make two lists, one for yes and the other for no, and brainstorm my ideas. I make a note of all the ideas I have which could support answers to the yes-no question.


YES / AGREE

  • need houses – somewhere to live
  • need offices – somewhere to work
  • old buildings = unsafe in an earthquake
  • old buildings = ugly
  • old buildings – remember bad history e.g. prisons, slavery
  • new buildings = practical
  • old buildings = impractical



NO / DISAGREE

  • old buildings = beautiful
  • old buildings – remember history
  • Melbourne = quaint, pretty, historical
  • Brisbane = new, ugly, modern
  • old buildings = tourism



You can see that some of my ideas are repetitive but at this brainstorming stage this is OK. I will edit my ideas more when it comes to the next step: planning.


When brainstorming, I also think about some of the words I would like to include in my essay. In this one I think I would like to use the following words (in one form or another):  

  • cultural heritage
  • elegant
  • historical
  • modern
  • grand
  • timeless
  • architecture

In addition, I decide that I would like to use the following collocations:  

  • timeless elegance,
  • former glory
  • significant contribution
  • structurally unsound

By making a note of these words now, I can come back to them when I am planning, writing, or even when I am checking my work.




Step 3

Next, I sort my ideas into a plan:


INTRODUCTION

  • Keep the old buildings

BODY PARAGRAPH 1


MAIN IDEA 1:

  • Old buildings are beautiful

SUPPORT: 

  • Add to city’s attractions
  • Can be refurbished e.g. Shopping arcade in WGN, MEL. 
  • Local people can enjoy them
  • Architecture is timeless

BODY PARAGRAPH 2


MAIN IDEA 2:

  • Old buildings have historical significance

SUPPORT:

  • Parliament buildings
  • Tourist attraction
  • Tourists can enjoy them

BODY PARAGRAPH 3 

BALANCE / ACKNOWLEDGE:

  • Old buildings = unsafe
  • e.g. Earthquakes

REFUTE:

  • Reinforcing
  • Just as good as new buildings

CONCLUSION

  • Keep the old buildings



My plan would be in more note form than above, but in this case I want you to be able to read and understand it. You can see that Body Paragraph 1 is about aesthetics, whereas Body Paragraph 2 is about history. Both paragraphs main ideas are in agreement that old buildings should be kept.


Body Paragraph 3 mentions an opposing idea, that old buildings might be dangerous. However, this idea is then refuted, taking the reader back to my opinion that old buildings can be kept if they are maintained properly.




Step 4

After analysing the question, brainstorming, and planning, it’s now time to write. Here is my essay as I first wrote it:

A city’s old buildings should be treasured as part of its cultural heritage. Not only are such buildings beautiful but they also have historical significance. They should definitely not be knocked down in the name of so-called “progress”.


First, old building makes a city look attractive. These grand structures are beautiful to behold and their timeless elegance supersedes all modern architecture. Such buildings often define the city itself,  for example, London would not be the same without Big Ben. Even unused old buildings can be refurbished and brought back to their former glory, such as the Old Bank Arcade in Wellington’s CBD.

In addition, old buildings often play an important role in remembering history of a city. They may tell a story of the people who first built the city, historical figures who lived or worked in the building, or those who made significant contributions to the city’s architectural landscape. These types of buildings, such as Parliament House in Brisbane, are not only pretty to look at but are also now touristic attractions.


It cannot be denied that older buildings may be deemed structurally unsound and therefore may pose a risk to their inhabitants. For example, a natural disaster such as an earthquake. However, with careful reinforcing using modern technology, these buildings can be as safe as their modern counterparts.

In conclusion, old buildings play an important role in a city. These beautiful buildings should be protected by law and carefully preserved as monumental reminders of a city’s history.



Step 5

Now I check my essay and make some minor adjustments. Here is the finished result:

A city’s old buildings should be treasured as part of its cultural heritage because not only are such buildings beautiful but they also have historical significance. They should definitely not be knocked down in the name of so-called “progress”.


First, old buildings make a city look attractive. These grand structures are beautiful to behold and their timeless elegance supersedes all modern architecture. Such buildings often define the city itself, for example, London would not be the same without Big Ben. Even unused old buildings can be refurbished and brought back to their former glory, such as the Old Bank Arcade in Wellington’s central business district.


In addition, old buildings often play an important role in remembering the history of a city. They may tell a story of the people who first built the city, historical figures who lived or worked in the building, or those who made significant contributions to the city’s architectural landscape. These types of buildings, such as Parliament House in Brisbane, are not only pretty to look at but are also now tourist attractions.


It cannot be denied that older buildings may be deemed structurally unsound and therefore may pose a risk to their inhabitants in the case of a natural disaster such as an earthquake. However, with careful reinforcing using modern technology, these buildings can be as safe as their modern counterparts.


In conclusion, old buildings do play an important role in a city. These beautiful buildings should be protected by law and carefully preserved as monumental reminders of a city’s history.



While checking this essay, I made sure all my subjects and verbs are in agreement. I checked that my pronouns are not too repetitive and that it is clear who or what they refer to. I added because to the first sentence, and wrote CBD in its full form. I added the article, the, to history of a city, and changed touristic to tourist. In addition, I made the topic sentence in Paragraph 3 longer and added do for emphasis in the conclusion.




I hope you found this helpful. The next blog post will be about the same topic but taking the opposite viewpoint.



For more information about writing for Task 2 in IELTS, please take a look at my e-courses on www.yes-ielts.com.




– Tish

from Blogger http://ift.tt/2cJnIOX

IELTS Writing Group Course

 http://ift.tt/1Q8u3Q8

NEW! 


YES! IELTS Group Course for  
IELTS Writing Task 2
Location: Brisbane, Australia


This course is suitable for canditates who are seeking 7.0 or higher in IELTS Writing.

Includes:

  • 2-hour face-to-face group class in Brisbane
  • 2-week online course comprising:
    • 10 online tutorials with online tutor support
  • 2 x 20-min one-to-one Skype sessions
  • 1 x 45-minute group chat session
  • Class forums for Q & A
  • 7 x Task 2 essays graded with personalised feedback


Course Aims:

  • Use your time efficiently during the test
  • Present a fully developed position in answer to the question with relevant, fully extended, and well-supported ideas (TR)
  • Sequence ideas and information logically, manage all aspects of cohesion, and skilfully manage paragraphing (CC)
  • Demonstrate your wide range of vocabulary fluently and flexibly to convey precise meaning (LR)
  • Show off your grammatical ability by demonstrating a wide range of structures with flexibility and accuracy (GRA)


Course Enrolment Pre-requisites:

  • 6.5 or higher in IELTS Writing
  • 7.0 or higher in IELTS Listening
  • 7.0 or higher in IELTS Reading


Maximum number of students: 7


Cost: $ AU 369

Earlybird special: $ AU 329


2015 Course Dates:

  • 13 – 27 May 2015
  • 17 June – 29 July 2015
  • 15 – 29 July 2015
  •  5 – 19 August 2015
  • 16 – 30 September 2015
  •  7 – 21 October 2015
  • 21 October – 4 November 2015 (TBC)
  • 18 November – 2 December 2015


from Blogger http://ift.tt/1Q8u3Q8

Your English Tutor: Tish Kirkland


Tish Kirkland has been teaching English as a Second/Foreign language since 2002 and IELTS since 2003.

Her interest in global education arose from her own school years, during which she attended local schools in New Zealand and Canada, and an international school in Saudi Arabia.

She has worked as an English language teacher and examiner in England, Tunisia, New Zealand, and Australia, as Director of Studies and School Manager in Ireland, and now teaches students from all around the world through her online e-courses.
 
Having personally faced the challenges of living and working abroad, Tish is passionate about helping others get their English language qualifications so that they can enjoy a positive experience in an English-speaking country.

You can read more about Tish on her personal website: http://ift.tt/1IFhVjW, follow her blog: http://ift.tt/1IFhXsc, or connect via LinkedIn.

from Blogger http://ift.tt/1H12Vi5

What Students Really Need to Hear

AFFECTIVE LIVING

It’s 4 a.m.  I’ve struggled for the last hour to go to sleep.  But, I can’t.  Yet again, I am tossing and turning, unable to shut down my brain.  Why?  Because I am stressed about my students.  Really stressed.  I’m so stressed that I can only think to write down what I really want to say — the real truth I’ve been needing to say — and vow to myself that I will let my students hear what I really think tomorrow.

This is what students really need to hear:

First, you need to know right now that I care about you. In fact, I care about you more than you may care about yourself.  And I care not just about your grades or your test scores, but about you as a person. And, because I care, I need to be honest with you. Do I have permission to be…

View original post 765 more words